Backdating employee stock options

Posted by / 24-Jul-2020 00:07

Backdating employee stock options

Disordered, untimely paperwork was cited as the cause in some cases of unintentional backdating.

Initially, lax enforcement of the reporting rule was also blamed for allowing many companies to sidestep the rule adjustment that stemmed from Sarbanes-Oxley.

With more criminal charges in the pipeline, companies and executives need to understand the potential scope of criminal liability. ('Securities Act'); Securities Exchange Act of 1934, 15 U. Tax Fraud Executives who used backdating practices may also face criminal prosecution for federal tax fraud. Therefore, to be criminally liable under the Code's criminal statutes, a person must 'willfully attempt[]to evade or defeat any tax imposed by [the federal government].' I.

There are three major areas of potential criminal liability for former executives involved in stock options backdating: securities fraud, tax fraud, and mail or wire fraud. Backdating only becomes illegal when executives fail to disclose the practice in financial reports, and fail to properly account for backdated options according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and the relevant tax laws. Three possible violations of the Internal Revenue Code ('Code') could create criminal liability for backdating: (1) exceeding the compensation deduction limits of Section 162(m), (2) failing to qualify options under the rules that govern incentive stock options in Section 422, and (3) violating the provisions of Section 409A regulating deferred compensation.

In addition, discounted options that do not have a fixed exercise date are subject to an additional twenty percent penalty tax.

Therefore, any executive who failed to account for backdated options under 409A and/or failed to pay the penalty tax for options lacking a fixed exercise date could be criminally liable for willfully failing to pay taxes, see, e.g., I. C.7202, or providing fraudulent and false statements in a tax return, see, e.g.

Criminal charges for backdating could include alleged violations of Section 17(a), 15 U. C.77q, which prohibits fraudulent interstate transactions, and Section 10(b), 15 U. This means a company must properly disclose and account for any backdating practices in its financial statements. Furthermore, the failure to record an expense for discounted options granted to employees might result in understated financials, which could in turn make other financial reports inaccurate, particularly net revenues.

The basic violation under these statutes is the same: an intent to defraud another by means of an untrue statement of material fact or an omission of a material fact necessary in order to make a statement not misleading. Regardless of which acceptable GAAP approach a company used in valuing options,a statement in a company's financials stating that the strike price was equal to the fair market value ('FMV') on the grant date would be false or inaccurate if the company backdated options. Aside from interest and penalties that might accrue if a company amends its income tax returns, executives who implemented backdating practices may also be criminally liable for willfully failing to pay taxes, see , e.g., I. C.7202, or providing fraudulent and false statements in a tax return, see , e.g., I.

The act of options backdating became much more difficult after companies were required to report the granting of options to the SEC within two business days.

Wire And/Or Mail Fraud Finally, improper backdating practices could also subject an executive to criminal liability for violations of the federal mail and wire fraud statutes, which prohibit the use of mail or wire communication in furtherance of a 'scheme or artifice to defraud' or to 'obtain[] money or property by means of false or fraudulent pretenses, representations, or promises.' 18 U. Two GAAP approaches, Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees , Accounting Principles Bd.

Section 409A would apply only to options granted since its enactment in 2004. Under either statute, the penalties are the same and a conviction can result in substantial fines plus up to 20 years imprisonment.

The SEC would go on to investigate and sue companies and related parties that were found to backdate options, in some cases, as part of fraudulent and deceptive schemes.

For example, the SEC filed a civil lawsuit in 2010 against Trident Microsystems and two former senior executives from the company for stock option backdating violations.

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